Today’s Critical Thought looks at the debate of knowing just how much to tell the player about how their game works. There is a line between making something so explanatory that the game plays itself, to having systems that no one will ever figure out on their own.

Are there examples of games that withhold information and are better because of it? Let me know in the comments.

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Talos Principle

One of the hardest challenges of designing a game is knowing when to end development/the game. We’ve seen games come out way too soon with unfavorable reviews and broken design. Just like how there are games that take forever to come out and the time didn’t translate into greatness. Today’s post is going to be more on the philosophical side of things, and examine how much you can get out of your game mechanics.

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Today’s Critical Thought is essentially Design 101 for people interested in thinking like a game designer. I talked about the concepts of “mechanics, systems and dynamics,” and how they apply to game systems. While this isn’t a complicated lesson, being able to structure your thinking can help you when it comes to describing and building your game.

 

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Forced Showdown (2)

Recently I tried out Forced: Showdown which combined light ARPG play with CCG mechanics to great effect. The use of CCG mechanics is another option in the Game Designer’s toolbox to create great games from, but it’s important to understand the limitations and rewards for such a game design.

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