Starting today and every Friday, we’re going to end the week with an episode of our podcast. Where myself, Game-Wisdom’s site designer Kenneth Oum and guests down the line, will talk about game design and the industry.

Today’s podcast references my post on Co-op Horror Design as both Kenneth and I are fans of horror games, but not exactly thrilled where mainstream horror design is going. As well as Peter Molyneux’s kick starter, and The Walking Dead from Telltale Games.

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Mark of the Ninja

Stealth game design has evolved dramatically over the years with major series on both consoles and the PC. Titles ranged from Metal Gear, to Thief and even in horror with Amnesia: the Dark Decent.

Each series tried to capitalize on scaling down the basic mechanic of most games: action. Some of them got it right, while others became a frustrating endeavor. But one common element in any game about stealth is designing it just right, which requires the designer to get around two important elements. These said elements are what Mark of The Ninja by Klei Entertainment gets right and why it is one of the best games this year.

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art games

This past week I played two very different adventure games: To The Moon and The Walking Dead episode 5. Both titles are completely different from each other in terms of story and design except for one area. They are both built around the player being an observer with limited game play; another name for these types of titles is “art games.”

While I enjoyed both titles for the stories they represent, however I feel torn as someone who studies game design. Classifying both titles as “games”, they would be rip apart in any examination that focuses on gameplay. And because of that, for today’s post I’m going to take the role of the contrarian and ask: should interactive stories be called games?

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sandbox games

Since Grand Theft Auto 3 came on to the scene over a decade ago, game makers have been trying to outdo each other with coming up with open worlds to explore. The open world genre is one of the most demanding genres to create, where the game space is just as important as what the player is doing in it.

From Arkham City, to Mars and several interpretations of New York City, the open world genre is full of multiple interactions and gameplay systems. The genre has really exploded over the last few years as different designers have been figuring out the elements that work and don’t work within the genre.

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